We are all humans with limited capabilities.

All of us are just humans with limited capabilities. We are not perfect nor will we ever be perfect.

But then, how do we grow to reach that limited potential that we actually have?

Through listening to the advice of the generations before, by making right the things that they’ve made wrong, to not repeat their mistakes ever again.

I believe that each new generation builds up from the generations before them and each new generation leverage those lessons that have been compiled for them.

So, I guess, the lesson for me today is to listen to the advice of seniors and people that have gone through the journey, to not be full of myself, to remain humble even if I just so happen to be more knowledgeable (rarely happens but you get the point).

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Humility, an important skill

I have this problem.

The problem of humility.

Recently, it came to my attention that it is hard to remain humble, to choose the right words to say to not appear arrogant, rude, or full of yourself. It is hard to bring yourself down to a level that will be deemed respectful.

I guess it is particularly hard for me because I feed off of this energy of self-confidence, competition and putting myself on a high horse. This could actually be a defence mechanism that I’ve erected from the experiences I had in the past. To remain stoic, emotionally unmoved by the words of others.

But as I grow older, I’m conscious of this ‘defence mechanism’ and now I realised that it could be more of a bane than a boon.

Thus, it has come to my attention to fixing this problem, to rewire my brain to be humble and master the art of humility.

And it will always be a work in progress.

A painful lesson for myself: humility

I started this blog because I treasure memories and I wanted to record them down for my future self to read.

But for that to work effectively, I have to be 100% open and truthful too.

So, let me be just that.

There’s a lesson that I believe has been one of the hardest for me to digest and practice, which is the lesson of humility.

Death and prayer bring humility to the soul of a person. However, I have yet to truly grasp the essence of being humble. To know how to be humble is one thing but to truly practise the art of humility is another.

It is even more so when the urge to get recognition, validation from others will continue poking at you like an annoying little brother. I guess, it just shows how deep I have dived into this world of gratification and a habit I’m trying hard to break.

I guess it all started when I begin to realise that having people associating you with your work is a confidence booster. It truly is. But, slowly and surely, it will become something that consumes you as your work is now more focused on capturing the attention of others instead of honest and sincere work.

Once you get that validation ball rolling, your humility will slowly disappear. And that is something that I truly fear.

In National Service, I was always taught and told to be humble, to respect others and bring yourself low. This lesson was especially important for officers like me. In retrospect, however, I guess it was a lesson that I did not embody and I truly regretted that. Maybe my life in NS would have been vastly different otherwise.

In Islam too, we were taught be humble, to bring ourselves down to the level of others, to speak kindly and on the same frequency as the person we’re talking to.

There are still so much more that I can learn to embody the art of humility. A lesson that I’m painstakingly trying to master.

I guess, it all takes time. All I have to do is persevere on.

I will also try to be sincere in my craft. To put aside the thought of validation and do it sincerely, for the sake of my future self.

Listen, Full Attention.

In this world that is increasingly full of distractions from messages to social media, it becomes harder and harder to listen and give people our fullest attention.

I too am guilty of using my phone as others are talking, preferring to reply unimportant texts than conversing with others who are centimetres away from myself.

It becomes a habit that I begin to realise and be completely aware of.

Thus, I am trying my best to give someone my full attention by putting my phone away when it is time to converse.

I guess it is a basic form of respect and also, one can truly learn a lot about the other person if one is willing to give their fullest attention.

For me, it is a habit in progress.

Chasing an Education

Jobs are harder to find,

Degrees are rapidly decreasing in value,

Graduates struggle to make ends meet.

So, is there any purpose in pursuing an education?

Well, I believe that it truly depends.

In my case, I pursue an education because I am fascinated in the subject. I am curious about learning the inner workings of Biology and reaching a level whereby I am able to truly understand the complexities of Life.

I did not enrol into a university so that I can get a job in the future but because of the deep interest I have in the subject and I think that that should be the reason why we pursue an education.

At the end of the day, I believe that our intention matters because ultimately, you have to weigh the pros and the cons of getting an education. Is it worth it to spend thousands of dollars on an education that does not promise you a stable career after or would you rather spend that money to build something for yourself?

Sometimes, we make a decision to enter university because it seemed to be the right path to take but have we ever pondered if it is truly beneficial for us in the first place?

Stop letting that herd mentality affect you but find and truly understand the reason you’re chasing an education.

Degrees aren’t everything.